FRANCA Sozzani. Fashion and architecture. <br> <br> A life into images: the visual storytelling | meetyourMOOD

31 October 2017

FRANCA Sozzani. Fashion and architecture.

A life into images: the visual storytelling



La vita ricomincia ogni giorno
 Franca Sozzani 



This month, my dear MOODers, the icon is Franca Sozzani

[ Franca: Chaos and Creation || documentary by Francesco Carrozzini  ]

Italian fashion editor from Mantova, during her carrier at Vogue and beyond, has been able to transform the idea of fashion editorialism into a new concept: the visual storytelling.


Back in the days when the fashion photography was producing not much more than catalogues of products, she started nurturing a dazzling talent roster of emerging photographers including Mario Testino, Paolo Roversi, Herb Ritts, Peter Lindbergh, Bruce Weber and Steven Meisel to visually narrate the society using fashion as a new key to report facts and social issues.

The Milanese sensibility to consider fashion as inextricable from intellect and her ability to combine her high-profile position with philanthropy and inclusion, defined a new era. The fashion industry was ready to open the discussion about social justice, creating cutting-edge art related to cultural topic able to push the conversation forward.




In 1988, when Franca became Editor in Chief of Italian Vogue [ meanwhile Anna Wintour was made the Editor in Chief at American Vogue], she immediately shook up the title with dynamic covers and content, creating an “extravagant, experimental, innovative” magazine with a powerful visual language.


"ONLY ITALIANS READ ITALIAN” 

She knew that she needed instead 
to communicate through powerful imagery.


“Il Nuovo Stile” [ the new style], the sepia-toned black and white image by Meisel of Robin MacKintosh wearing a plain white Ferré blouse, was a clear statement that she was not going to be playing by anyone else’s rules.

In line with her image based approach, she let the photographers take over, turning Vogue into a magazine that not only celebrated the power of the image, but also used fashion stories as a platform to discuss broader issues and the obsessions of the fashionable world.  
Franca had a passion for photography and a deep knowledge of fashion and its history, together with the ability to keep an amused distance from its modern day excesses, fearless in her willingness to tackle provocative and controversial social and cultural issues through the medium of fashion shoots.

 
MAKEOVER MADNESS || Photo by Steven Meisel || Vogue Italia, July 2005

BEFORE FASHION, 
 I LOVE IMAGES

Franca has been the picture of perfection her whole life. Her personal taste extended into the environments she created for herself in each one of her residences around the world, for which she adopted a similarly uniform minimal look: stern black and white lines created a spotless and fuss-free gallery-like aesthetic in all her domestic surrounding.

Her houses were the expression of her personal philosophy.

 
The apartment in Milano is a stylish Gio Ponti–era apartment in the fashionable heart of town, filled with Deco and modern furniture, with works that reflected her passion for photography and her engagement with contemporary art, collaborating with Maurizio Cattelan and Vanessa Beecroft.
 
 
FASHION ISN'T REALLY ABOUT CLOTHES
IT'S ABOUT LIFE

 
She also owned an airy family getaway in Portofino, a town house in New York and in Marrakech she acquired a series of riads in the heart of the medina, creating a unique property with high-ceilinged rooms decorated in rich, spicy colors, its splendors offset by the contemplative calm of its De Chirico–esque courtyards with their arched loggias and verdant gardens.








via architecturaldigest.com
IF I WEREN'T IN FASHION, I WOULD HAVE GONE INTO REAL ESTATE OR ARCHITECTURE. BUT NOT INTERIOR DESIGN. BECAUSE WHAT I REALLY LIKE IS THE DIVISION OF THE HOUSE, NOT WHERE TO PUT THE COUCH AND FLOWERS

 

To refurbish as well as furnish the four-story home in the Paris property, a magnificent 19th-century townhouse, Massimiliano Locatelli was the architect in charge of the project.

Cutting a huge holes in the ground-floor walls to bring air and light enhancing the minimal layout with pure white walls in contrast with wood floors dyed black.













this article is part of 
http://www.meetyourmood.com/search/label/meetTHEicon


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