#2 BESTGRAM with MARIA SVARBOVA MOOD | meetyourMOOD

17 July 2017

#2 BESTGRAM with MARIA SVARBOVA MOOD


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MáRIA ŠVARBOVá , photographer and art director from Slovakia

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B L U E  |  W A T E R  |  O C E A N  |  P O R T U G A L
 

of the color whose hue is that of the clear sky :  a blue jacket 

 

bluish : the blue haze of tobacco smoke

bluish gray > a blue cat

   
    low in spirits :  melancholy >  has been feeling blue

    marked by low spirits :  depressing >  a blue funk things looked blue

  
    of a woman :  learned, intellectual
    … the ladies were very blue and well-informed … — W. M. Thackeray

   
    puritanical
    … a blue Sunday city … — James Street

   
    profane, indecent  > a blue movie

 
    music :  of, relating to, or used in blues > a blue song

   
    "blue in the face" > extremely exasperated argued until he was blue in the face



 

 

ORIGIN 1250-1300:

Middle English blewe 

Anglo-French blew

Old French blo, blau

Germanic *blǣwaz; compare Old English blǣwen, contraction of blǣhǣwen deep blue, perse 

Old Frisian blāw

 Middle Dutch blā(u)

Old High German blāo (German blau)

Old Norse blār

 

" It turned out that it wasn't just the Ancient Greeks who never said the sky was blue. None of the ancient languages had a proper word for blue. What we now call blue was once subsumed by older words for black or for green. (In fact, this is why in Japan green lights are actually a bluer shade of green than in the rest of the world. The word used for the green of traffic lights is ao, which used to mean "green and blue" but now means blue. Rather than change the word, they changed the colour.)

Deutscher has a lot of fun relating the discovery that colour words emerge in all languages in a predictable order. Black and white come first, then red, then yellow, then green and finally blue. (Although sometimes green is before yellow.) Red is probably first because it is the colour of blood and of the easiest dyes to make in the wild. Green and yellow are the colours of vegetation. And blue is last because – with the exception of the sky – few naturally occurring things are blue and blue dyes are very difficult to make. "